Winter gardening

A winter harvest

Today in Myrtle Beach, S.C. it is 39 degrees F and raining.

A typical winter day for us on the coast. It has been a bit rainier than normal, but not by much.
Even with the cold and rain, it doesn’t mean that gardening has stopped here. In our zone 8b, gardening is year-round.

Right now, I have lettuces, onions, peas, broccoli, mustard greens, 3 types of kale, cilantro, kohlrabi, pak choy, calendula, swiss chard, carrots, parsley, oregano, fennel, dill, collard greens, and garlic.

Carrots fresh out of the dirt

Under a cover, I have started radishes and spinach. In the seed starting area, I have tomatoes, peppers, marigolds, zinnias, eggplant, cabbage, broccoli and mustard greens. These, as they grow with heat mats and are moved in and out of the sun, will be ready for spring when the ground has warmed.

It was just last year that I bought the heat mats to start seeds earlier than March. It has helped get a jump start on the season. It also extended my season because the plants are ready to go and then new ones can be put in their place when they’re finished.

Collard greens with frost

Winter garden crops also need less attention. There aren’t as many bugs, it rains so you don’t have to water as much and the plants are hardier than delicate square or tomatoes.

However, that doesn’t mean they don’t need to be checked and fertilized. Because of the extra rain, nutrients in the soil can be washed away faster – so you’ve got to feed your plants. As Martha Stewart says, you have to eat and your plants have to eat.

So what can you do if you don’t live on the coast like me? Well, you can have a green house. You can have a cold frame or you can plant some herbs or smaller items on a sunny window sill. You can also enjoy a break from digging in the frozen, cold dirt and dream of spring and summer.

Camellia

Winter is a great time to plan and many gardeners also order their seeds during this time of year. If you’re craving winter vegetables and you’re not growing them – contact your local farmer. See what they’ve got in the fields right now. Because there are not many farmers markets in the fall and winter, buying some of their produce will likely help them out a lot.

Got questions about winter gardening? Send me a note or comment below.

Also, stay tuned this week for some exciting news!

4 thoughts on “Winter gardening

  1. Ahahahaha!! I can’t help it! I’m really envious of you right now, so it’s either laugh or cry. 😀 😉
    As I write this, we (in central Canada) have warmed up to -25C with a wind chill of -38C. That’s -13F and -36F. Winter gardening without a heated greenhouse just isn’t going to happen, here!
    I’ve been spending way too much time looking up seed companies and filling my wish lists, and gardening vicariously through blogs like yours, sharing what you can grow while we’re still in a deep freeze! 😀

    Like

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