Delicious Detroit-Style Pizza

There are so many styles of fantastic pizza. New York. Sicilian. Chicago. American. And then there’s Detroit.

According to michigan.org, in 1946, Gus Guerra owned what was then a neighborhood bar, Buddy’s Rendezvous, when he decided he needed something new for the menu. He enlisted the help of his wife, Anna, who borrowed a dough recipe from her Sicilian mother. The Sicilian dough, topped with cheese and tomato sauce, would become the model for pizza in Detroit.

For this pizza, it’s not only the shape (it’s square) and the way the pizza is made (the sauce is on top) that makes it different, it’s also the pan that it’s cooked in! You can’t have a Detroit-Style Pizza without the pan. I use this specific pan, which we bought off Amazon.

The pan creates a pizza that is soft and airy inside with a crisp exterior because of the caramelized cheese on the edges. I found that the warmed sauce is best put on after the pizza is baked! This way, it doesn’t weigh down any of the airy-ness that’s baking in the pan.

You can make Detroit-Style Pizza as easy or as homemade as you want. You can use store bought pizza crust and store bought sauce or you can make your own for both.

Here’s how ya do it.

Ingredients

  • Pizza dough (homemade or store bought)
  • Pizza sauce (homemade or store bought)
  • 1 block of mozzarella cheese
  • 1/2 block of cheddar cheese
  • Pizza toppings of your choice (pepperoni, veggies, etc.)
  • Softened butter
  • Detroit Style Pan (see link above to buy one)

Instructions:

If you choose to make your own pizza dough, that’s the first step. I’ve got a recipe for my favorite dough below.

Then, if you’re making your own pizza sauce, get that started. If you’re using store bought, don’t worry about it quite yet.

Preheat your oven to 475 degrees.

Butter your Detroit-style pan on all interior sides and stretch your dough out to cover the bottom and go up the sides just about an inch or so. Let the dough rest for 10 minutes.

Shred the cheeses and prepare your toppings. Place the cheese all the way to the edge of the pizza, so that it’s touching the sides of the pan. Put your toppings in the center and put more cheese on top.

Bake for 15-18 minutes.

While the pizza is baking, warm up your pizza sauce so you can dollop it on top after the pizza is baked. Don’t put too much on top, if anything you can add more when you serve it.

Let the pizza cool about 5 minutes, slice and serve! Enjoy!

Detroit-Style Pizza

Pizza dough:

  • 1 Tbsp. active dry yeast
  • 1 Tbsp. sugar
  • 1 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 1/4 cup warm water
  • 1 Tbsp. salt
  • 3 cups bread flour

Combine the yeast, sugar and water in the bowl of a stand mixer. Allow the yeast to come alive (about 5 minutes). Add the oil and one cup of the flour, then the salt and the other 2 cups of flour.

Mix with dough hook for 8 minutes.

Let rise until double in size.

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A little known Southern dish that’s delish … How to make Chicken Bog

Do you know what Chicken Bog is? Have you heard of it?

I’d imagine that unless you know someone from Horry (pronounced or-ee) County in South Carolina, you might not.

Chicken bog is THE dish of that corner of the state, so some would say. It’s a rice dish with chicken and smoked sausage, but unlike one you’ve ever had before. The name “bog” probably comes from the wetness of the dish, although some speculate that it may come from the bogginess of Horry County, according to discoversouthcarolina.com.

It is best eaten with a spoon and can be made any time of the year – even though it is very delicious and comforting in the colder months. There are recipes for it online now, but many who live here in Horry County learn how to make it from someone else.

A small part of this post is an ode to my former boss, Mr. Steve Robertson, who recently passed away. He was the publisher of the weekly newspaper I worked at for a number of years.

Mr. Steve was also the Loris Bog-off Champion one year and was generous enough to tell me how to make this iconic dish.

Here’s what you need.

Ingredients:

  • 3-4 large chicken thighs or breast
  • 3 cups of water
  • 1 tsp. dried Rosemary
  • 1 tsp. dried thyme
  • 1 tsp. dried parsley
  • 1 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1 tsp. onion powder
  • 1-2 stalk of celery, chopped
  • 1/2 onion, chopped
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 mounded cup of white rice
  • 1 smoke sausage
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Let’s start with the stock for the chicken bog.

Place the chicken thighs or breast into a large sauce pan and cover with three cups of water. Add in all of the spices listed above and simmer until the chicken is cooked. Cool for 15 minutes and then take chicken out of the stock, dice and put back into the stock water.

In a separate large stock pot, sauté the onion and celery in olive oil for about 7-8 minutes and then add the garlic. Sauté together for another 2 minutes.

While the onion & celery are cooking, dice the smoked sausage into bite sized pieces.

Once the onion, celery and garlic have cooked for about 10 minutes, add in the diced sausage. Then, add in the mounded cup of rice and cook for 1 minute.

Then, pour in the stock and diced chicken, all at once.

Stir, bring the mixture to a boil, cover, reduce the heat to low and simmer for 20-25 minutes. You can check on the rice and stir during this time. It will not ruin the rice.

Taste for seasoning and rice done-ness. Serve in a bowl. Enjoy!

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Baking Through History: A Series of Stories From Vintage Recipes

Vintage is all the rage right now. Whether vintage to you means the 90s or the 60s, bringing back what was once old is in.

First Baptist Church in Glenburn, N.D. Cookbook

From butterfly clips and bell bottom pants to your grandma’s Pyrex and bake ware, vintage is here to stay.

But what about vintage recipes? You know, the ones found in the church cookbooks that someone’s great aunt or grandma made.

What about those cookies, cakes and pies that bring a sense of nostalgia?

The Great Big Cookie Book by Hilaire Walden

I’m bringing those back. And, I’m going to document it all with video and blog posts.

I love to read old recipes. Cookies, cakes, pies … you name it. I read them not only to see if I’m interested in baking it – or tweaking it to sell in my home-based bakery, but also for fun.

I have quite a few old cookbooks already – ones from church groups, ones found at antique shops and old recipes passed down from my great-grandma and grandma. I’ll be pulling from those and from the books my mother-in-law, who also likes to bake and cook, has in her library and from friends who have volunteered their old books.

Favorite Recipes from Lutheran Brotherhood

Those old family recipes shared in simple books are stories. Stories that tell not only of the time in which they were created, but of the place they were created and of the people enjoying them.

So, in addition to baking and blogging, I’ll be researching to find the origin of those recipes to honor them and tell the story. Of course, you’ll get to see the book where I found the recipes – and get the recipe itself as well.

I hope to post one video/blog post per week as I make my way through vintage recipes. And I’d love to hear from you and share some of your old family recipes and the stories behind them. You can share them with me via email at pigdogfarms@gmail.com. You can send pictures of the recipe and then tell me of the memories you have with that recipe.

My first video and blog post is here! READ HERE

Baking through History series:

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